The New World and Your Little Feelers

Hello everyone! I know it has been a long time, and I like to imagine you miss reading my little stories.

Friends, we are in a bad place right now. It is not personal. I want you to stay a long way away from me. I am not being selfish. I am protecting both of us, and everyone else each of us comes  in contact with. I have a second level exposure. I’ll bet you didn’t now that. I have no idea about your level of exposure either.

Six feet is nothing. I know I can sneeze that far. No race, religion, friendship, geographical alignment, political party, or other denominator exempts anyone from this attack.

We have a common enemy, and it should  not be each other. Some of us take this more seriously than others. I like the more seriously side. That is my right, and as my friend, I am sure you respect that.

Read about what some of the other countries that were attacked before us did to prevent the spread. We can stop this, but we all have to be smart. And forget about the money for a minute or two.

Stay away from each other, yell across the yard to your neighbor, wave at everyone you see. It sucks for all of us. If there is a way to help someone who needs it, without endangering yourself or others, do it. Or just stay in your house and suck it up. Quiet reflection can be rewarding.

Respect each other’s space, keep calm, and be tolerant. We will put this behind us, but it will change us. Put your little feelers away, and just be kind. Please.

 

 

Jingle Rails

Yesterday my wife and I took one of our Grandsons to see Jingle Rails at the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

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The Eiteljorg is an art museum that features Native American and Western Art. They have some really amazing pieces there, and it is always an interesting place to visit. But yesterday was about a truly impressive miniature train display, and a young man who really loves his trains.

This exhibit recurs annually, I believe. The construction of the landscapes is amazing, done using natural materials, mostly of the plant variety.20200104_123205

As you can see, someone (s) spent a lot of time and effort to build this thing, and it is well worth the time to visit. It runs through January 21st this year.

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As I put this together, I am realizing that I said it was all about the trains earlier, but I now see that for me it was really the landscape they had constructed.

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So I guess I learned something about myself, and had a good time with my wife and Grandson.  I think that constitutes time well spent.

December Miles

2019 is gone. December was a good month for walking, and I got in a few miles. See below. 33.58 miles. You know what to do. December was the end of the commitment I made over one year ago. I hope some others people helped me with this.

December

 

You have all seen my monthly post, repeated again below. And you also know that in August I learned another of my friends has Parkinson’s disease. So as promised, I am doubling my monthly contribution to the Michael J Fox Foundation to $2.00 per mile.

First published September 5th, 2018:

My dear friend is battling Parkinson’s Disease. He has been for awhile. My Grandfather  ( not the one you already know, but my paternal Grandfather) also had this disease. Please take a few minutes to read and understand a little about Parkinson’s.

Ok, Brad, that’s a sad story, but what can I do about it? Well, I am glad you asked, because here is what we are going to do about it.

For every mile I log, through 2019, starting on September 1st 2018, I am going to make a donation to Parkinson’s research. And I am asking that you do the same thing too. I am pledging $1.00 for every mile that I log, but you could do whatever is comfortable for you.

I have logged about 120 miles this year so far, but I am going to be more diligent about logging all of my miles, so that number will go up. I will post my total miles here at the end of each month, and we can all go directly to http://www.michaeljfox.org to make our donation. Just click on the green tab in the upper corner. While you are there, read a little about their research.

I will also, for the same period of time, donate 30% of the proceeds from the sale of any of my paintings to this organization.

 

Thank you for helping!

Moon

 

Moon Pic

I was eight years old. I lived in a brick house on the muddy, flat ground, on the east of the Great Salt Lake. My mom and my dad and my sister lived there too. In our backyard there was the skeleton of an old barn. It was covered by a tin roof. When birds walked on the tin roof you could hear their feet skritching on the tin. In the evening the wind blew the stink of dead fish from the lake into our yard. There hadn’t been any fish in that lake for thousands of years. The Great Salt Lake is the shriveled corpse of Lake Bonneville, an ancient inland sea. Maybe there were fish in the lake back then. I woke up in the middle of the night. The wind stank and I could hear bird feet on the tin roof. Most birds don’t move around at night. I crept from the house on sweet bare feet. The yard was dark except for the pale shadow-light of a new moon. There were hundreds of black birds on the still warm tin roof of our barn. They were milling around, privately conferring with one and other about something that was apparently very important to them. They all appeared to be very serious about this thing. I climbed up the age slickened wooden ladder slats that led to the tin roof. My dad had told me to never do that. I swung onto the tin roof and sat down on the peak with my chin on my knees. The birds didn’t care. I could see the night city lights, from Saltaire all the way to Syracuse. The lake was a black stain. The black birds made up their mind. They flew in a black wave, out over the muddy fields. They flew up at the moon. The moon disappeared. The birds kept flying up and away, out of sight. The moon was still gone. The black birds took it. I waited until the false dawn, then slithered down and snuck back into bed. I climbed onto the barn roof every night after that. The moon was gone. The birds were gone. The tin stayed warm all night from the heat of the day’s sun. On the seventh night in a row I went to the barn. At the top of the ladder sat a great raven. There was a sliver of white light in his eye. Ravens are pitch black. I went up the ladder with the greatest of stealth. The raven did not move. As I pulled myself up next to him, I could hear his stinking raven breath rasping through his beak. Ravens eat dead things. I took my knife from my pocket. Little boys sleep in their jeans so they will always have pockets. I cut off the gleaming eyed ravens head with my knife. His body flew away, really quietly, into the night. His head was still in my hand. The white sliver of light was still in his eye. I flung the head with all of my might out over the mud, toward the lake. I threw it farther and harder than I’d ever thrown anything. It went up and up until it reached the black moon spot. Then the moon was back, there in its moon spot. I felt a breeze on my cheek, and the stink wind came into the yard. I put my knife back in my pocket. I climbed down and went back to bed.

November Miles

It is the last day of November, and it is raining. So my walk this morning will be all I get today. 30.74 miles this month. You know what to do.

 

You have all seen my monthly post, repeated again below. And you also know that in August I learned another of my friends has Parkinson’s disease. So as promised, I am doubling my monthly contribution to the Michael J Fox Foundation to $2.00 per mile.

First published September 5th, 2018:

My dear friend is battling Parkinson’s Disease. He has been for awhile. My Grandfather  ( not the one you already know, but my paternal Grandfather) also had this disease. Please take a few minutes to read and understand a little about Parkinson’s.

Ok, Brad, that’s a sad story, but what can I do about it? Well, I am glad you asked, because here is what we are going to do about it.

For every mile I log, through 2019, starting on September 1st 2018, I am going to make a donation to Parkinson’s research. And I am asking that you do the same thing too. I am pledging $1.00 for every mile that I log, but you could do whatever is comfortable for you.

I have logged about 120 miles this year so far, but I am going to be more diligent about logging all of my miles, so that number will go up. I will post my total miles here at the end of each month, and we can all go directly to http://www.michaeljfox.org to make our donation. Just click on the green tab in the upper corner. While you are there, read a little about their research.

I will also, for the same period of time, donate 30% of the proceeds from the sale of any of my paintings to this organization.

 

Thank you for helping!